Bird’s-Nest Custody

While relatively unknown, a bird's nest custody arrangement is probably the best possible arrangement for children. However; as it involves the most self-sacrifice and cooperation on the part of the parents, it is generally not even considered. In a Birds-nest custody arrangement, the children continue to live in the original family home. It is the parents who come and go, taking turns living there with the children. It does require that each of the parents have a second place to live, when they are not staying with the children.

Occasionally, a divorced couple will go in on an apartment together to minimize the costs. This can be the ideal situation, as the parents never are there at the same time, unless the children are present also. While rare, it is an idea that should be explored more frequently if couples are truly interested in doing what is in the best interest of the children. This type of decree does work with families who are devoted to the concept of the family, even though the parents are not living together any longer. It does require that the parents should be on good terms with each other. Matters become involved which would not normally be a part of the day to day concerns of divorced parents: things such as leaving the living residences in a clean and neat manner, and upkeep of the properties.

Some of the benefits to consider in a Bird's-Nest Custody arrangement is that the child gets to maintain a single residence, instead of having the "my Dad's house" or "my Mom's house" kind of lifestyle. Occasionally, a judge may grant the grandparent child's nest custody, with each parent rotating into the home. While it is the least disruptive for the children, it is the parents who are inconvenienced.

Deciding on a divorce is never easy, and deciding on a custody agreement can be one of the hardest parts of a marriage dissolution. Finding the best child custody arrangement is just one of the many difficulties you will face as you go through a divorce and the subsequent child custody arrangement. Make sure that you have a family law attorney who can provide you with all of the information and resources you need to properly advise you on what is best for your children. Emotionally, this type of custody arrangement can be most helpful for the children involved. It can make sense logistically as well.

This can also be an ideal answer if the child has physical disabilities which would make changing residences more difficult. Give some consideration to this unusual but many times very successful type of child custody. It may be the answer for your child's best shot at having a smooth transition to their new life as the child of divorced parents.